COLLECTION 2016−2017

consists of colors present in
Philipp Malyavin’s
"Whirlwind"
consists of colors present in
Filipp Malyavin's
"Whirlwind"
COLLECTION 2017
Colors that blaze. If you gaze long enough it hurts your eyes, and yet you cannot look away. Something magical arises within... In this whirlwind of colors, there is an undercurrent, some kind of force, something leading your thoughts to places far removed from the painting. I always fancied it presented an involuntary and vague clue to that special something in the Russian spirit.
Sergey Goloushev ("Glagol"), literary critic (1855-1920)
F. Malyavin. Fragment from the Whirlwind.
"Whirlwind" is dangerous to look at. Malyavin cuts through the skin, delving ever stronger and deeper.
"Malyavin conveys the wild nature of Russians. The strength and power flowing through Russian women, these fragile vessels contain such force that it is only through God's grace and power that it is infrequently released.

This stunning effect is impossible to achieve if one doesn't live in this environment, understand it, feel it through every pore of your soul. Like the mythical salamander passing through the element of fire, it sheds its' skin yet remains unchanged, able to preserve the memory.

The memory of that internal fire within which it is impossible to live, yet it is the selfsame fire that burns away all that is extraneous, alien, feeble and useless. For the salamander to live without this element is equally impossible, hence she dies."



Tina Guy, philosopher
"Malyavin conveys the wild nature of Russians. The strength and power flowing through Russian women, these fragile vessels contain such force that it is only through God's grace and power that it is infrequently released.

This stunning effect is impossible to achieve if one doesn't live in this environment, understand it, feel it through every pore of your soul. Like the mythical salamander passing through the element of fire, it sheds its' skin yet remains unchanged, able to preserve the memory.

The memory of that internal fire within which it is impossible to live, yet it is the selfsame fire that burns away all that is extraneous, alien, feeble and useless. For the salamander to live without this element is equally impossible, hence she dies."


Tina Guy, philosopher
The painting was first exhibited at the "World of Art" in 1906. Tretyakov's daughter (Alexandra Pavlovna Botkin) was on the Board of the Tretyakov Gallery and wrote to one of its trustees, Ostroukhov: "Malyavin is dizzying and a genius". Soon the "Whirlwind" was acquired from Malyavin and became part of the Tretyakov Gallery collection.

Malyavin mixed his paints in such way that they took an unusually long time to dry. It is often said by those who come to the Tretyakov Gallery that his colorful painting seems to leap into movement.
With a four meter width spanning almost the whole exhibition wall, it is an avalanche of impressions attacking the viewer with vibrant folk elements of celebration, and rural culture. It is a hymn of Russian identity, the ability even through the of hardest of times to dance, laugh, rise above adversity, drawing the strength to live, rising from the ashes again and again.
F. Malyavin. Whirlwind.
State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Hall №38.
By creating the "Malyavin Grunge" collection we have tried through use of fabric, texture and color to convey as much as possible the painters energy of tones and forms, a living quality in motion, the Russian whirlwind, which — whether we wish it or not — lives in all of us.
By creating the "Malyavin Grunge" collection I have tried through using fabric, texture and color to convey as much as possible the painters energy of tones and forms, a living quality in motion, the Russian whirlwind, which — whether we wish it or not — lives in all of us.
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